Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Each year, the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History awards the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, an annual award for the most outstanding non-fiction book in English on the subject of slavery, resistance, and/or abolition. The submission deadline typically is at the end of March.

Please note that works related to the Civil War are acceptable only if their primary focus relates to slavery or emancipation. Detailed submission information for books copyrighted in 2018 will be available in December, 2018. 


Rutgers and Harvard Professors Share the 20th Annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Erica Armstrong Dunbar (left) and Tiya Miles

The 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize will be shared by two scholars: Erica Armstrong Dunbar for “Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” (37Ink/Atria Books); and Tiya Miles for “The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits” (The New Press).

Dunbar is the Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Miles is professor of history and the Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.

The Douglass Prize was created jointly by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University’s MacMillan Center and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York City. It is awarded annually by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the best book written in English on slavery or abolition. The $25,000 prize, shared by the two winners, will be presented to Dunbar and Miles at a reception sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute in New York City on Feb. 28. The reception also celebrates the 20thanniversary of the Frederick Douglass Book Prize.

The full prize announcement is available here: https://glc.yale.edu/frederick-douglass-book-prize/past-winners/2018


Sponsored by

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

and

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

————————————————————————————-

The Gilder Lehrman Center is Supported by The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale