Frederick Douglass Book Prize


2021 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Submissions 

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History are pleased to announce the twenty-third annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize, an annual award for the most outstanding non-fiction book in English copyrighted in the year 2020 on the subject of slavery, resistance, and/or abolition.  

 

Beginning on January 13, 2021, we invite you to submit books that meet these criteria. The submission deadline is Friday, April 2, 2021. 

 

Please note that works related to the Civil War are acceptable only if their primary focus relates to slavery or emancipation. Only books copyrighted in 2020 will be considered.  

For details on submission requirements, contact: gilder.lehrman.center@yale.edu with subject heading: FDBP 2021 


Yale announces 2020 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Winner

New Haven, Conn.— Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition announces the winner of the 22nd annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize. The 2020 winner of the prize is Sophie White for “Voices of the Enslaved: Love, Labor, and Longing in French Louisiana” (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press). White is Professor of American Studies, Concurrent Professor in the Departments of Africana Studies, History, and Gender Studies, and Fellow of the Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame. 

One of the most coveted awards for the study of global slavery, the Frederick Douglass Book Prize is sponsored jointly by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at the MacMillan Center at Yale University. The $25,000 award for the best book published in English on slavery, resistance, or abolition will be presented to White in an online celebration on February 23, 2021. 

In addition to White, the other three finalists for the prize were Kellie Carter Jackson for “Force and Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence” (University of Pennsylvania Press); Keila Grinberg for “A Black Jurist in a Slave Society: Antonio Pereira Rebouças and the Trials of Brazilian Citizenship” (University of North Carolina Press); and Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers for “They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South” (Yale University Press). The February ceremony will recognize the four books for their original archival research, the quality of scholarship and writing, and their broad relevance to contemporary readership. 

The full prize announcement is available here: https://glc.yale.edu/news/yale-announces-2020-frederick-douglass-book-prize-winner


Sponsored by

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

and

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

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The Gilder Lehrman Center is Supported by The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale