Frederick Douglass Book Prize


2019 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Submissions

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History are pleased to announce the twenty-first annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize, an annual award for the most outstanding non-fiction book in English copyrighted in the year 2018 on the subject of slavery, resistance, and/or abolition. 

Beginning on January 2, 2019, we invite you to submit books that meet these criteria. Please do not begin sending books prior to this date. The submission deadline is Friday, March 29, 2019. Please note that works related to the Civil War are acceptable only if their primary focus relates to slavery or emancipation. Only books copyrighted in 2018 will be considered. For details on submission requirements, contact: gilder.lehrman.center@yale.edu with subject heading: FDBP 2019


Yale announces 2019 Frederick Douglass Book Prize Winner

Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition announces the winner of the 21st annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize. The 2019 winner of the prize is Amy Murrell Taylor for Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps (University of North Carolina Press). Taylor holds the Theodore A. Hallam Professorship in History at the University of Kentucky.

One of the most coveted awards for the study of global slavery, the Frederick Douglass Book Prize is sponsored jointly by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at the MacMillan Center at Yale University. The $25,000 award for the best book published in English on slavery, resistance, or abolition will be presented to Taylor at a celebration in New York City on February 13, 2020. The celebration also will present a Special Achievement Award to Julius S. Scott’s The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution (Verso). Scott is Lecturer of Afroamerican and African Studies, Emeritus, at the University of Michigan.

In addition to Taylor, the other two finalists for the prize were Jessica A. Krug for Fugitive Modernities: Kisama and the Politics of Freedom (Duke University Press) and Brooke N. Newman for A Dark Inheritance: Blood, Race, and Sex in Colonial Jamaica (Yale University Press). The February ceremony will recognize all four books for their depth of research, originality, methodological sophistication, and literary merit.

The full prize announcement is available here: https://glc.yale.edu/news/yale-announces-2019-frederick-douglass-book-prize-winner


Sponsored by

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

and

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

————————————————————————————-

The Gilder Lehrman Center is Supported by The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale